An Apache Blessing – A Little Beauty For Your Day

Yellow Lilies, Apache Blessing mamawolfe
beautiful blessing

 

May the sun bring you new energy by day,

May the moon softly restore you by night,

May the rain wash away your worries,

May the breeze blow new strength into your being.

May you walk gently through the world

and know its beauty all the days of your life.


~ Apache Blessing
Just because I need a beautiful blessing right now…and thought you might, too.
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Jennifer Wolfe

Jennifer Wolfe, a writer-teacher-mom, is dedicated to finding the extraordinary in the ordinary moments of life by thinking deeply, loving fiercely, and teaching audaciously. Jennifer is a Google Certified Educator, Hyperdoc fanatic, and a voracious reader. Read her stories on her blog, mamawolfe, and grab free copies of her teaching and parenting resources.

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7 thoughts on “An Apache Blessing – A Little Beauty For Your Day

  1. Dawn Wink says:

    Love this, love this. One of my favorites. Beautiful flowers to savor. Thank you for this beauty!

    1. So glad you enjoyed it…beautiful lilies are my favorite, you know 🙂

    1. Cheryl, you’re welcome. I hope I can spread a moment of beauty and peace across the internet. Thanks for commenting! -Jennifer

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    An Apache Blessing – A Little Beauty For Your Day – mamawolfe

  3. Buzzee says:

    This nice-sounding saying is NOT of native-American origin:
    It was written for the 1947 Western novel Blood Brother (novel) by Elliott Arnold. The blessing entered popular consciousness when it made its way into the film adaptation of the novel Broken Arrow, scripted by Albert Maltz. The Economist, citing Rebecca Mead’s book on American weddings, characterized it as “‘traditionalesque’, commerce disguised as tradition”.
    The first line of the original poem was “Now for you there is no rain” and the last “Now, forever, forever, there is no loneliness”. Since 1950, there have since been several different versions of the poem.
    Check ianchadwick.com and other sources.

    1. Thanks for your comment! ~jw

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